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Friday 10th July

More measuring mass! Make sure you remember that we measure mass in grams (g) and kilograms (kg) and that there are 1000g in 1kg.

Challenge 1:

Challenge 2:

Thursday 9th July

Today, I want you to continue with measurement but we are moving on to measuring mass. That's where you weigh how heavy something is. There are some sheets to learn about this but it might be nice if you could get your scales out at home and try measuring the mass of different items. You could even do some cooking and measure the ingredients if it's OK with your adult at home.

Challenge 1:

Challenge 2:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answers:

Ch1:

Amir is wrong because he has counted on 3 from 10 kg when he should have counted back 3 kg.

Jack is wrong because we can work out the scale by using the 10 kg and counting back. They weigh 7 kg.

Rosie is correct because half of 10 is 5 and the arrow is past where 5 kg would be. The weight of the potatoes is 7 kg

Ch2:

The chocolate bar must weigh the same as two muffins so one muffin must weigh 50 g. Each side weighs 150 g.

muffin = 50g muffin = 50g muffin = 50g
muffin = 50g chocolate bar = 100g

 

Wednesday 8th July

Challenge 1:

Challenge 2:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answers:

Ch1:

Jack is quickest. If we convert 2 minutes 23 seconds into seconds it is 120 + 23 = 143 seconds. So Jack was 10 seconds quicker than Alex.

Ch2:

TRUE

FALSE 4 minutes is equal to 240 seconds

FALSE 170 seconds is equal to 2 minutes 50 seconds

 

Tuesday 7th July

Today, I want us to add and subtract time so we can solve start and end times of events. A number line is the best written method for solving these. The column method (HTO) will not work as time isn't out of 100, it's out of 60 so be careful!

Challenge 1:

Challenge 2:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answers:

Ch1:

I agree with Amir, because Whitney has not remembered that there are 60 minutes in an hour and has added 45 minutes to 2:40.

Ch2:

Possible answers include:

Start at 15.20 and end at 16.10

Start at 15.25 and end at 16.05

Start at 15.30 and end at 16.00

Start at 15.35 and end at 15.55

Start at 15.40 and end at 15.50

Monday 6th July

 

Continuing with time, we are going to look at finding out the duration of events and comparing them.

Challenge 1:

Challenge 2:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answers:

Ch1:

Eva is incorrect. Eva took longer to finish the race therefore she finished after Mo. The winner of a race is the person who finishes in the shortest amount of time.

Ch2:

Jack has worked out the time from 3:15 p.m. until ten to 9 in the evening. He should start at 8:50 a.m. and work through noon to 3:15 p.m.

Friday 3rd July

Today, I want you to apply your knowledge of time to find out the duration of events (how long). You will need to remember that there are 60 seconds in a minute, 60 minutes in an hour, 24 hours in a day.

Challenge 1:

Challenge 2:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANSWERS:

Ch1:

Eva finishes at 13:00 or 1 o’clock

Ch2:

Both children’s methods are correct.

Teddy has found the duration by 15 + 15 + 15 + 10 = 55 minutes.

Rosie has found the duration by noticing that one hour after the start of lunch it will be 1:15, so she needs to take 5 minutes from 1 hour to also give 55 minutes.

 

Thursday 2nd July

Today, I want us to apply our learning of a.m. to p.m. to tell the time on a 24 hour clock. As we know, there are 24 hours in a day. 12 hours in the a.m. and 12 hour in the p.m. 

With a 24 hour clock, once we get to 12 noon, the numbers keep going up!

So 1pm = 13:00 and so on.

Start by writing the 24 hour clock time to these a.m and p.m times.

1:00am =

2:00am =

3:00am =

4:00am =

5:00am =

6:00am =

7:00am =

8:00am =

9:00am =

10:00am =

11:00am =

12:00pm =

1:00pm =

2:00pm =

3:00pm =

4:00pm =

5:00pm =

6:00pm =

7:00pm =

8:00pm =

9:00pm =

10:00pm =

11:00pm =

12:00am =

 

Challenge 1:

Challenge 2:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answers:

Ch1:

Eva could be correct. The clocks are both showing twenty past 8. However,  the analogue clock does not show whether the time is a.m. or p.m., so this could be showing 8.20 a.m. or 8.20 p.m.

Ch2:

Teddy is not correct. For example: 18:00, 8:30, 10:38 do not show 8 o'clock.

 

Wednesday 1st July - a new month, a new concept!

 

We are going to go back to looking at the unit of measurement time. I am not going to do any lessons on telling time to the nearest minute as that can be difficult without being in class but I will attach some worksheets on it for you to do as an extra if you wish. I will also add some homework related to time on EducationCity! It would be great if you could get an adult to ask you the time at various points in the day so you can practise reading and telling the time as well!

Today, I want us to look at AM and PM when telling the time, this will help us begin to see how this links to a 24-hour clock.

Remember that we use a.m. for the morning up until 12 noon. After that, we use p.m. for the afternoon up until 12 midnight!

Challenge 1:

Challenge 2:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANSWERS:

Ch1:

Ron could be catching the train to Edinburgh or Leeds. Analogue clocks give no indication to a.m. or p.m. and since it is 20 past 7, Ron could be catching the 8:20 a.m. train or the 7:35 p.m. train.

Ch2:

Dora is more likely to be correct, because if she sleeps 8 p.m. to 8 a.m., she would be sleeping through the night, and wake up in the morning. Teddy is likely to be incorrect, because he would be sleeping all day and waking up at 8 p.m. (in the evening)

Tuesday 30th June

Today is our last day on fractions so I have given you some problem solving activities involving all the skills we have learnt and practised. Feel free to use today to go back and answer any challenges you may have missed as well on this page (answers are always below the challenges).

Monday 29th June

Subtracting fractions

Challenge 1:

Challenge 2:

Challenge 3:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answers:

Ch1:

7/7 − 3/7 = 2/7 + 2/7

7/9 − 5/9 = 4/9 − 2/9

Ch2:

Jack has taken two fifths away. Annie has found the difference between four fifths and two fifths.

Ch3:

There are lots of possible answers.

Examples are:

7/9 + 2/9 = 9/9

9/9 - 2/9 = 7/9

3/9 + 1/9 + 3/9 = 7/9

Friday 26th June

Adding fractions

Challenge 1:

Challenge 2:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answers:

Ch1:

Rosie is correct. Whitney has made the mistake of also adding the denominators.

Ch2:

1/12 + 11/12

3/12 + 9/12

5/12 + 7/12

Thursday 25th June

Ordering fractions

Challenge 1:

Challenge 2:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answers:

Ch1:

Jack is incorrect. When the denominators are the same, the larger the numerator, the larger the fraction

Ch2:

Either 7 or 8 parts shaded.

Either 2 and 1 parts shaded or 1 and 0 parts shaded.

 

Wednesday 24th June

 

We are going to look at comparing fractions today using >, < and =

 

Challenge 1:

Challenge 2:

Challenge 3:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answers:

Ch1:

1/3 is smaller because it is split into 3 equal parts, rather than 2 equal parts. 

Ch2:

Multiple options:

1/3, 1/4, 1/5, 1/6, 1/7, 1/8, 1/9

Ch3:

3/5 is the largest - when the numerators are the same, the smaller the denominator the larger the fraction.

Tuesday 23rd June

 

More equivalent fractions...

Challenge 1:

Challenge 2:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answers:

Ch1:

Always, children could also think of the numerator as being half of the denominator.

1/2, 2/4, 3/6, 4/8, 5/10, 6/12 etc

Ch2:

This is impossible. Dora may have mistaken the numerator for the denominator and be thinking of 6/9 which is equivalent to 2/3

Monday 22nd June

 

Equivalent fractions - continued...

Challenge 1:

Challenge 2:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answers:

Ch1:

Alex is correct. Tommy’s top number line isn’t split into equal parts which means he cannot find the correct equivalent fraction.

Ch2:

Friday 19th June

Today, we are going to look at equivalent fractions. That means fractions that are the same!

Take a look at this fraction wall - if you look carefully, you will be able to see how some fractions are the same size! Which ones can you spot?

​​​​​​1/2 = 2/4 = 4/8 = 5/10 = 6/12 - Can you see how they're all the same size?

You may have spotted some others.

Is there another pattern you can spot with those numbers in the fraction?

 

Bar models make it much easier to spot equivalent fractions - have a go at the activities below. 

 

 

Challenge 1:

Challenge 2:

Challenge 3:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answers:

Ch1:

The diagram is divided in to six equal parts and four out of the six are yellow. You can also see three columns and two columns are yellow.

Ch2:

The circle is the odd one out because the other fractions are all equivalent to 1/2

Ch3:

Mo is correct. He could make three ninths which is equivalent to one third.

Dora is incorrect. She has a misconception that you can only double to find equivalent fractions.

Thursday 18th June

 

One more day...

Challenge 1:

Challenge 2:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answers:

Ch1:

150 cm

This is 1 4 of his original roll of material.

Ch2:

Alex drank 600 ml of the juice.

Eva drank one fifth of the juice.

The fraction of juice left is 1/5 of the bottle.

Wednesday 17th June

 

Fractions of amount continued...

Challenge 1:

Challenge 2:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answers:

Ch1: 

16

Ch2:

Ron has £4 left. This is 1 7 of his original amount

Tuesday 16th June

 

We are going to find fractions of amounts today! Remember to use the bar model to help you!

Challenge 1:

Challenge 2:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answers

Ch1:

2

Ch2:

80

10

Monday 15th June

 

Today, we are going to use our knowledge of fractions to place them on a number line! To do this, you need to remember how the bottom number of a fraction (denominator) represents the amount of parts and the top number of a fraction (numerator) represents how many of those parts.

Let's compare a number line to a bar model using tenths to show you.

Just like the bar model, the number line has 10 parts and the numerator goes up with each section.

 

Challenge 1:

Challenge 2:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answers

Ch1:

Tommy is correct because Eva has missed 1 whole out.

Ch2:

They will reach 4 and 1/3

Friday 12th June

 

Today, we are going to link the tenths to decimals! As we know, tenths is when a whole has been split into 10 parts. A whole number can also be split into 10 parts and those parts are a decimal. You might remember this from when we were measuring using cm and mm.

Here are bar models to show you tenths and decimals - can you spot the pattern?

 

1
1/10 2/10 3/10 4/10 5/10 6/10 7/10 8/10 9/10 10/10

 

1
0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0

So for example:

2/10 = 0.2

1 and 3/10 or 13/10 = 1.3

 

Challenge 1:

Challenge 2:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answers:

Ch1:

They are both correct.

10 cm = 1

10 m = 0.1 m

Ch2:

 

 

Thursday 11th June

 

Today, we are going to continue looking at tenths and how to count!

For example:

1/10, 2/10, 3/10, 4/10, 5/10, 6/10, 7/10, 8/10, 9/10, 10/10....

What do you think would come next??

It would either be 11/10 or 1 and 1/10 because 10/10 is the same as 1 whole. 

 

 

Challenge 1:

Challenge 2: 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answers

Ch1:

Teddy thinks that after ten tenths you start counting in elevenths. He does not realise that ten tenths is the whole, and so the next number in the sequence after ten tenths is eleven tenths or one and one tenth.

Ch2:

True for both 

 

Wednesday 10th June

 

Today, we are going to focus on tenths!

How many parts do you think a bar model would have to show tenths?

The clue is in the name! 10!

To make a whole, how many tenths would it be?

10! 10/10.

whole
1/10 1/10 1/10 1/10 1/10 1/10 1/10 1/10 1/10 1/10

 

 

Challenge 1:

Challenge 2:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answers:

Ch1:

Ch2:

The marbles are the odd one out because they represent 8 or eighths. All of the other images have a whole which has been split into ten equal parts.

 

Tuesday 9th June

 

Today, I want us to look at how fractions can be added together to make a whole!

In this example, 1/3 of the shapes are triangles and 2/3 of the shapes are circles. If we add these fractions together we get 3/3 which is the same as a whole. 

We can see this with a bar model too!

1
1/3 1/3 1/3

Because this fraction is thirds, the whole one has been split into 3 groups. all 3 groups make a whole!

If it was in quarters, there would be 4 groups and all 4 groups would make a whole and so on and so on!

Challenge 1:

Challenge 2:

Challenge 3: 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answers:

Ch1:

No because 6/6 is equal to one whole, so Ted has eaten all of his pizza.

Ch2:

The same/equal.

Ch3:

Monday 8th June

We are going to start by looking at fractions - referring them to the bar model in that fractions are split into equal parts/groups and so it is the same as dividing!

So 1/2 is split into 2 groups, 1/3 is split into 3 groups, 1/4 is split into 4 groups and so on!

1 (12)
1/2 (12÷2 = 6) 1/2 (12÷2 = 6)

 

1 (12)
1/3 (12÷3 = 4) 1/3 (12÷3 = 4) 1/3 (12÷3 = 4)

 

1 (12)
1/4 (12÷4 = 3) 1/4 (12÷4 = 3) 1/4 (12÷4 = 3) 1/4 (12÷4 = 3)

 

24

8

8

8

 24 ÷ 3 = 8 so 1/3 of 24 = 8

 

24
8 8

8

2/4 = 1/4 + 1/4 so 2/4 of 24 = 8 + 8 which is 16!

Challenge 1:

Challenge 2:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answers:

Ch1:

False, one quarter is shaded. Ensure when counting the parts of the whole that children also count the shaded part.

Ch2: 

There are no unit fractions that are equal to one whole other than 1 1 but this isn’t in our list.

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